Coaching

On a fundamental level, True Competition challenges us to re-imagine what sport can and should be. All competition, including sport, involves pursuing excellence through meeting the challenge posed by a worthy opponent. In that pursuit, we can learn valuable lessons, and develop many positive character traits. Excellence, ethics, and enjoyment truly go hand in hand.

But coaching for True Competition doesn’t happen by accident. It happens by design. How should you define your teams goals, both in terms of acquiring sport skill, and in terms of character development? How can you run effective team meetings? How can you cope with the heightened game-day emotions of your players? Of your players’ parents?

Our workshops on coaching for True Competition are the best way to answer these questions, and to learn how to implement the True Competition approach. But these free coaching resources can help get you started, and give you a taste of what True Competition is all about.

  • Harvard Business Review Online Article Recently, our co-founder Dr. David L. Shields, was asked to speak on competition (and decompetition) by the Harvard Business Review. ┬áHere is a link to the full text of that article: http://blogs.hbr.org/cs/2013/02/a_more_productive_way_to_think_about_opponents.html
  • Sports and Character Development Abstract For more than a century, the contention that sport builds character has been popular among educators. The more cautious perspective of researchers is that sport might build character, but only under the right conditions. In this paper, Brenda Light Bredemeier, Ph.D., and David Light Shields, Ph.D., report on three aspects of character that may be ...
  • Rethinking Competition True Competition is a more than a catch-phrase, it is a provocative theory about the very nature of competition–how and when it works, its limitations, and its pitfalls. Our lives in a democratic, capitalist country are encompassed by competition, suffused by it, but it is something we rarely discuss without resorting to anecdotes and cliches. We ...
  • Youth Sports Are They Good for Kids To sport or not to sport? That is the question that many parents of school-age children are asking. Perhaps you’ve heard stories of tunnel-vision coaches who push children under the guise of making them champions or of narcissistic parents who try to relive their childhood (real or imagined) through ...
  • Get More from Competition David Shields, Ph.D. Whether you are in sports or business, whether you compete for fun or profit, there are hidden strategies both to boost your performance and find more enjoyment in the process. Here are five such strategies. First, to maximize your likelihood of winning (whether a game or a contract), forget about winning! The more that you ...

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